Flying Hound Fences

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http://donnahughes.com/wordpress/flying-hound-fences/

We need Volunteers building fences in Randolph County, NC & surrounding areas.

Please join or donate! Let’s get dogs off chains, once & for all! Please be sure to “like” our Facebook page.

 

 

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FLYING HOUND FENCES Application for Fencing Assistance

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All Dogs/Cats are required to have current Rabies vaccines as required by NC State Law. Please provide proof of current vaccine history. (If your pets are not current with vaccinations, we can guide you in arranging for your pets to receive appropriate vaccines.)

All Dogs/Cats are required to be spayed or neutered. (If your pets are not currently spaed or neutered, an appointment will need to be made and kept with a local veterinarian or one of the local low cost spay/neuter clinics.)

  • Sheets Pet Clinic 336-852-8488
  • Planned Pethood 336-299-3999

Proof of Complainace Will Need To Be Provided

Provide Copies of Following -- That Apply -- (including Breed limitations, numbers, size, etc..)

  • Pet Rental Agreement
  • Statement From Landlord Allowing Pets on the Property
  • Homeowners Associations Paperwork
  • Rabies Certificates for Each Pet
  • Verification of Spay/Neuter Surgery or Appointment
  • Total Combined Household (Tax Returns, Pay Stubs, etc)
  • Verification of Government Assistance Received (Medicaid, EBT, SSI, ect..)

I understand that if I am approved for a fence build from Flying Hound Fences, it is my responsibilty to keep the fence in good repair and address any situations for each individual dog that may be of conern for their safety, well-being and containment in the enclosure. While every foreseeable precaution has been taken by Flying Hound Fences to insure my safety and that of my pet(s), I will not hold the agents, Flying Hound Fences, and/or Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc., responsible for any adverse effects that might occur from this fence build or the supplies that I have received. I also understand that Flying Hound Fences and/or Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc. has the right to terminate assistance in the event that statements made above are found to be fase or for any reason deemned necessary by the board of executors. Including, but not limited to, any public health and safety issues that may arise from providing assistance.

I have read and understand all of the above conditions and by the above conditions and by signing my name below and submitting this application, I agree to abide by all conditions declared on this release statement.

Please Mail Additional Material to 

Happy Hills Animal Foundation, Inc

3143 Happy Hills Dr.

Staley, NC 27355

or 

Scan/Email to:

office@hhaf.org

 

Click to Donate

By Chip Womick
cwomick@courier-tribune.com
Twitter: @ChipWomickCT

 

TRINITY — Last fall, Donna Hughes promised to help build fences for dog owners who could not afford a fence if Randolph County commissioners passed an anti-tethering ordinance.

She made the spur-of-the-moment pledge last October during brief remarks to commissioners who were being asked to consider placing limitations on chaining dogs out of doors. The idea popped into her head that she did not want county leaders to pass on the proposal because it might be a financial burden for some.

So, she volunteered to help.

Randolph commissioners approved the anti-tethering ordinance that night, and Hughes plans to honor her words. There was never any doubt about that. Her daddy, the late Ed Hughes, taught her to say what you’re going to do and to do what you said you are going to do.

She established Flying Hound Fences, under the umbrella of Happy Hills Animal Foundation, a no-kill animal shelter in northeastern Randolph County. The idea is to use cash donations, donated materials and volunteers to build fences for unchained dogs.

“I can’t do this by myself,” she said.

With enough people sharing the workload, Hughes figures a volunteer might only need to give a few hours of time every other month. She envisions erecting fences larger than 10 feet square.

“I don’t think small pens are the answer,” she said. “It’s going to be (built from) whatever we have at our disposal.”

A Durham-based group called the Coalition to Unchain Dogs, whose volunteers build fences (and offer many other services for dogs and their owners), generates some of the money to do the work via fund-raisers. Hughes plans to do the same.

A few have stepped up to say they will help, but so far no one has requested a fence.

Yellow dog

One very cold winter night two years ago, Hughes was so worried about a dog chained in a neighbor’s yard that she could not sleep.

It was not the first night that concern about the yellow dog — left outdoors to fend for itself year-round, no matter the weather — had kept her awake, but on this night, she wrote a song. It was a natural way to express herself. The singing and guitar- and piano-playing Randolph County native has written more than 500 songs.

“Dog on a 10 Foot Chain” came quickly. She uploaded to YouTube a simple video of herself playing the piano and singing the tearjerker. A few months later, she spent three days in a Nashville studio and recorded a more polished version of “Dog on a 10 Foot Chain” with the help of other talented musicians.

She also recorded numerous other songs and released a pair of new compact discs in the summer of 2015 — “From the Heart” and “Fly,” her fifth and sixth CDs. The former features Hughes at her bluegrass best; the latter features her playing piano with cello, violin and bass violin accompaniment. They were released on her own label, Running Dog Records.

“Dog on a 10 Foot Chain” is on both CDs. Soon, DJs started playing “Dog on a 10 Foot Chain.” A lot. It rose to #1 on the Roots Music Report’s Top 50 Bluegrass Songs chart, a spot it held for many weeks.

A video that accompanies the bluegrass version includes heart-rending images of dogs on chains, as well as heart-lifting images of dogs running free.

She wrote another song, “One Less Dog in the Cold,” also designed, as Hughes describes it on her website, “to touch hearts and provoke change/thought/actions” on the issue of chaining dogs. A gut-wrenching video accompanies that song, too.

Hughes also visited the Randolph County Animal Shelter, which is located next to the Randolph County landfill at 1370 County Land Road, Randleman, to film a public service announcement about Randolph County’s anti-tethering law.

The law says

Randolph’s ordinance makes it unlawful to use tethering as the regular method for keeping a dog on the owner’s property. The new ordinance defines tethering as “the act of tying, chaining or restraining a dog to a fixed object with a rope, chain or other device in order to keep the dog confined.”

Dogs can be tethered for “a reasonable period of time” for waste elimination or for exercise on a dog run, but not 24 hours a day.

Penalties and fines will not be assessed until Jan. 1, 2017, to give time to educate the public about the new ordinance. The penalty for violating the tethering section will range from a warning (no fine) to $50 for the first charge, $100 for the second charge and $200 for the third charge.

* * *

For more information about Flying Hound Fences, contact Donna Hughes by phone at (336) 472-6363 or via email at donna@donnahughes.com. Donations of building materials can be dropped off at Happy Hills Animal Foundation, 3143 Happy Hills Drive, Staley, NC 27355; the phone number is (336) 622-3620. To have someone pick up materials, contact Hughes. For more information about the county’s anti-tethering ordinance, call Randolph County Animal Control at (336) 683-8235.

- See more at: http://courier-tribune.com/living/features/randolph-s-anti-tethering-ordinance-music-donna-hughes-ears-video#sthash.sGlTO04S.SaUCx84p.dpuf

By Chip Womick
cwomick@courier-tribune.com
Twitter: @ChipWomickCT

TRINITY — Last fall, Donna Hughes promised to help build fences for dog owners who could not afford a fence if Randolph County commissioners passed an anti-tethering ordinance.

She made the spur-of-the-moment pledge last October during brief remarks to commissioners who were being asked to consider placing limitations on chaining dogs out of doors. The idea popped into her head that she did not want county leaders to pass on the proposal because it might be a financial burden for some.

So, she volunteered to help.

Randolph commissioners approved the anti-tethering ordinance that night, and Hughes plans to honor her words. There was never any doubt about that. Her daddy, the late Ed Hughes, taught her to say what you’re going to do and to do what you said you are going to do.

She established Flying Hound Fences, under the umbrella of Happy Hills Animal Foundation, a no-kill animal shelter in northeastern Randolph County. The idea is to use cash donations, donated materials and volunteers to build fences for unchained dogs.

“I can’t do this by myself,” she said.

With enough people sharing the workload, Hughes figures a volunteer might only need to give a few hours of time every other month. She envisions erecting fences larger than 10 feet square.

“I don’t think small pens are the answer,” she said. “It’s going to be (built from) whatever we have at our disposal.”

A Durham-based group called the Coalition to Unchain Dogs, whose volunteers build fences (and offer many other services for dogs and their owners), generates some of the money to do the work via fund-raisers. Hughes plans to do the same.

A few have stepped up to say they will help, but so far no one has requested a fence.

Yellow dog

One very cold winter night two years ago, Hughes was so worried about a dog chained in a neighbor’s yard that she could not sleep.

It was not the first night that concern about the yellow dog — left outdoors to fend for itself year-round, no matter the weather — had kept her awake, but on this night, she wrote a song. It was a natural way to express herself. The singing and guitar- and piano-playing Randolph County native has written more than 500 songs.

“Dog on a 10 Foot Chain” came quickly. She uploaded to YouTube a simple video of herself playing the piano and singing the tearjerker. A few months later, she spent three days in a Nashville studio and recorded a more polished version of “Dog on a 10 Foot Chain” with the help of other talented musicians.

She also recorded numerous other songs and released a pair of new compact discs in the summer of 2015 — “From the Heart” and “Fly,” her fifth and sixth CDs. The former features Hughes at her bluegrass best; the latter features her playing piano with cello, violin and bass violin accompaniment. They were released on her own label, Running Dog Records.

“Dog on a 10 Foot Chain” is on both CDs. Soon, DJs started playing “Dog on a 10 Foot Chain.” A lot. It rose to #1 on the Roots Music Report’s Top 50 Bluegrass Songs chart, a spot it held for many weeks.

A video that accompanies the bluegrass version includes heart-rending images of dogs on chains, as well as heart-lifting images of dogs running free.

She wrote another song, “One Less Dog in the Cold,” also designed, as Hughes describes it on her website, “to touch hearts and provoke change/thought/actions” on the issue of chaining dogs. A gut-wrenching video accompanies that song, too.

Hughes also visited the Randolph County Animal Shelter, which is located next to the Randolph County landfill at 1370 County Land Road, Randleman, to film a public service announcement about Randolph County’s anti-tethering law.

The law says

Randolph’s ordinance makes it unlawful to use tethering as the regular method for keeping a dog on the owner’s property. The new ordinance defines tethering as “the act of tying, chaining or restraining a dog to a fixed object with a rope, chain or other device in order to keep the dog confined.”

Dogs can be tethered for “a reasonable period of time” for waste elimination or for exercise on a dog run, but not 24 hours a day.

Penalties and fines will not be assessed until Jan. 1, 2017, to give time to educate the public about the new ordinance. The penalty for violating the tethering section will range from a warning (no fine) to $50 for the first charge, $100 for the second charge and $200 for the third charge.

* * *

For more information about Flying Hound Fences, contact Donna Hughes by phone at (336) 472-6363 or via email at donna@donnahughes.com. Donations of building materials can be dropped off at Happy Hills Animal Foundation, 3143 Happy Hills Drive, Staley, NC 27355; the phone number is (336) 622-3620. To have someone pick up materials, contact Hughes. For more information about the county’s anti-tethering ordinance, call Randolph County Animal Control at (336) 683-8235.

 
- See more at: http://courier-tribune.com/living/features/randolph-s-anti-tethering-ordinance-music-donna-hughes-ears-video#sthash.sGlTO04S.SaUCx84p.dpuf